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Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic diseases via Duodenal Minor Papilla: 135 cases treated by Sphincterotomy, Endoscopic Pancreatic Duct Balloon Dilation (EPDBD), and Pancreatic Stenting (EPS)

Published on: 8th July, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8175469767

Treatments via the minor papilla is effective where the deep cannulation via the major papilla is impossible in such cases as [1] the Wirsung’s duct is inflammatory narrowed, bent or obstructed by impacted stones [2] pancreatic duct divisum (complete or incomplete) [3], maljunction of pancreatico-biliary union with stones [4], pancreatic stones in the Santorini’s duct. In [1,2] cases, the pancreatic juice flow via the major papilla decreases, while that of the minor papilla increases. Then the size of minor papilla and its orifice shows corresponding enlargement. This substitutional mechanism is an advantage when undertaking our new method. Since the pancreatic juice flow is maintained via the minor papilla in these cases, accurate and careful endoscopic skills are necessary to prevent pancreatitis due to the occlusion of the Santorini’s duct after this procedure. We have experienced 135 cases treated via minor papilla in these 27 years, so we would like to report about its safety and efficacy.
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Scrotal Hydroceles not associated with Patent Processus Vaginalis in Children

Published on: 2nd May, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7666304079

Background: After the closure of patent processus vaginalis (PPV) in boys with indirect inguinal hernia (IIH) or hydrocele, large scrotal hydroceles can occur on rare occasions despite the complete occlusion of internal inguinal ring (IIR). We present some cases that may help to explain the cause of this rare occurrence. Materials: During last 14 years, six boys exhibited non-communicating large scrotal hydroceles (2 right, 1 left, 3 bilateral) among 352 children who underwent laparoscopic repair for hydroceles. Ages ranged from 7 months to 15 years with a median of 12 years. Five of them had a history of repair for hydrocele or IIH prior to the definitive surgery and one boy underwent an initial operation. Results: In all the patients, laparoscopic inspection at the definitive surgery revealed completely closed IIRs. One infant with primary hydroceles was found to have large hydroceles bulging into the peritoneal cavity. All the patients were treated with subtotal removal of the sac without any recurrence. Marked thickness of the sack walls with abundant lymph vessels was characteristic histopathological findings. Conclusions: The complete occlusion of the PPV does not always prevent the recurrence of hydrocele through alternative pathogenesis. The pathological findings of resected specimens suggested a disturbance in lymph flow in the testicular system. The subtotal removal of the sac is the treatment of choice. Diagnostic laparoscopy prior to a direct cut-down approach to the neck of the seminal cord is advisable to identify non-communicating hydroceles to avoid further impairment of lymph drainage around the IIR.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat