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Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences

Articles by Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences

Addition of Simvastatin to Carvedilol and Endoscopic Variceal Ligation improves rebleeding and survival in patients with Child-Pugh A and B class but not in Child Pugh C class

Published on: 20th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8299602911

Background: Even with current standard treatment after variceal bleeding which includes combination of nonselective b-blockers and repeated endoscopic variceal ligation, the risk of rebleeding and mortality are high. Statins exhibit an antifibrotic effect and improves HVPG. We evaluated whether addition of simvastatin to carvedilol plus EVL therapy reduces variceal rebleeds or death in patients with cirrhosis. Method: Patients with a variceal bleed 5 to 10 days before were randomly assigned to groups A [carvedilol (n = 69)] or group B [carvedilol (maximum dose - 12.5mg), and simvastatin (40mg/day) (n = 65)]. Primary end points were variceal rebleeding or death. Secondary end points were new complications of portal hypertension and serious adverse effects of drugs. Results: During a mean follow-up of 49.05 ± 25.74 weeks, composite end point i.e. rebleeding or death developed in 23 patients (33.3%) in group A and 12 patients (18.5%) in group B [HR for simvastatin = 0.512; 95% CI: 0.254 – 1.030; p = 0.06]. In subgroup analysis by excluding patients of Child C class, 18 patients (34.6%) in group A and 7 patients (13.6%) in group B developed composite end point [HR for simvastatin = 0.369; 95% CI: 0.154 – 0.887; p = 0.026]. 17.4% and 15.4% patients in group A and B developed additional secondary complication [HR = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.345-2.161; p = 0.75). No simvastatin induced significant adverse effects were found. Conclusion: Addition of simvastatin to carvedilol and EVL may reduce the rebleeding and death in patients with less advance liver disease.
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Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Hydroxychloroquine and Teneligliptin in Type 2 Diabetes Patients who are Inadequately Controlled with Glimepiride, Metformin and Insulin therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Parallel Group Design

Published on: 13th September, 2018

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7856189396

Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of Hydroxychloroquine in comparison with Teneligliptin in type 2 diabetes patients whose blood glucose levels were inadequately controlled with metformin, Glimepiride and insulin therapy. Methods: This was a randomized, prospective, parallel-group, experimental trial done in 300 Type 2 Diabetes patients who were uncontrolled (HbA1c=7.5–10%) with metformin, Glimepiride and insulin therapy. Patients were randomly divided into two groups one received Teneligliptin 20 mg (n=152) and other received Hydroxychloroquine 400 mg (n=148) while continuing insulin therapy with other 2 OHA. Insulin doses were adjusted to maintain normal blood glucose levels. Result: The adjusted mean change from baseline to endpoint in HbA1c was −1.2±0.5% in patient group receiving Hydroxychloroquine and −0.9±0.5% in patients group receiving Teneligliptin, respectively, with a significant between-treatment difference (p<0.001). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the Hydroxychloroquine (72%) and Teneligliptin (77%) groups. However, hypoglycaemic events were less common (p<0.001) and less severe (p<0.05) in patients receiving Hydroxychloroquine than in those receiving Teneligliptin. Conclusion: Hydroxychloroquine decreases HbA1c in patients whose type 2 diabetes is poorly controlled with high doses of insulin as compare to Teneligliptin. Addition of hydroxychloroquine to insulin therapy is also associated with reduced incidence of confirmed and severe hypoglycaemia.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat